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of the state of michigan. she led the fight working with senator roberts. and they worked together not just on the substance but worked together in a manner that allowed it to be bipartisan. i've made it a priority in my work representing the people of pennsylvania to keep pennsylvania's agricultural industry and our rural economy strong to support families in pennsylvania. agriculture is our state's largest industry. pennsylvania's farm gain value -- which is another way of describing cash receipts to growers -- and the last number that we have, which is a 2010 number, was $5.7 billion. a lot of people who probably haven't spent much time in pennsylvania think of it as a -- a state of big cities and small towns but they may miss the -- the substantial agricultural economy that we have. agribusiness in our state is a $46.4 billion industry. 17.5% of pennsylvanians are employed in the so-called food and fiber system. and one of the questions we have to ask is: what does this all mean? well, i think it certainly means that at least we need a five-year farm bill, not -- not a short-term farm b
at what is happening in michigan, thousands of union supporters turned out on the steps of the capitol to protest right to work measures. the measure passed. taking a look at the front page of "the detroit free press," "the law that is not over." "unions will not go down without a fight. recall efforts and legal challenges are possible." there you can see a union representative struggling with michigan state police yesterday over right to work legislation. here is the story -- host: "the washington post" has a map of right to work law states. "the wall street journal" take a look -- takes a look at which states are the most union heavy. the biggest ones are new york, alaska, hawaii, and washington. michigan comes right in behind washington. which is why "the wall street journal" goes with the headline that this is a blow in a particularly union dominated state. looking at some other news, this one out of the south, for "the new york times," "the gop control in north carolina, with a republican controlled legislature, long a politically moderate player will soon have its most conservati
twitter comments. atxn -- vatex and m ike says -- jim in michigan, the republican line, good morning. caller: some things i would like to see more of you hear a lot of people talking about voting for somebody who they believe is this gender or this race. let's put someone in place of character and experience and somebody who has done things. getting back to allowing the people to build the country when we were individuals. i think that is important. i think there is a lot more of this collectivism. we're never going to be able to have a president to help these different countries if we are hurting our own country here and we are not able to grow it. host: tie that into hillary clinton in 2016. caller: i think my concern about her in some regards is tha ti think i do not know how strong of a business persian she is. i think she is more of a liberal to moderate which is fine but i want to see somebody who is very much pro-u.s., pro-growth, and bring us back to growing us inside and promoting that as opposed to saying a more broader scope. i think that broader scope will come about when
, michigan, a republican caller. go ahead, frank. caller: yes. look, first of all, we need to find out like exactly who is mentally ill and who's not mentally ill and the rimets need to be like finish if someone lives in a house who is mentally ill, obviously, we cannot have weapons of any kind within their range. that's what the law should be. the law shouldn't be we shouldn't just outlaw all weapons we should just outlaw anyone who is obviously with mental issues. the guy who in virginia tech, he had a depression issue. he went to a doctor and still somehow got his hands on two .9 millimeter weapons and you can't tell me that the guy in colorado didn't have mental issue. you can just look at the guy and know that there's something wrong there. we just with to keep the weapons like out of the household or how far range for these people who have mental health. host: frank, the questions that you pose, who are the mentally ill, we will ask those types of questions tomorrow on "washington journal." we're going to have a roundtable discussion with a republican and a democrat who co chair the m
? >> guest: that's a complicated question, and i can speak from my own experience. i live in michigan where i'm not permitted to marry, and, in fact, we are constitutionally prohibited to have heritage or similar yiewn your -- union purpose, the terrible language of our constitution. mark and i talked about getting married, say, in new york, where i'm from or another state just to, but there are complications in terms of depending on what said you then end up living in. >> host: i understand, but it's not legal where you live. the question is in places like canada or netherlands, you know, for a number of years now, and no more than 10% of people enter legal unions. >> guest: i think that's partly because in many cases, couples have already cobbled together certain limited legal structures to the extent that they can. mark and i have a big expensive binder at home, and people have done that. there's questions about how all of that get affected. i think that's partly because, as you know, given your work over the last several decades, a marriage culture takes time to build, and, you know, when
will be poised for another big financial crisis. host: john joins us from michigan. independent. caller: good morning. thank you for educating people on your television show. we live in a community where we are experiencing exactly what you're talking about, particularly businesses, and i am talking big businesses. they do not like where the doors are located, or this department over here, and what they are doing is restricting jobs and tax base. i would encourage people to get involved in your institute and fight this because it is not doing anything for the economy or our country. merry christmas to everybody. host: john, thank you for the call. what is the history of the cato institute, founded in 1977? guest: it was founded to promote liberty and economic freedom, starting in san francisco, and then move into washington, d.c. milton friedman admitted the kindle institute has never sold out. we still work for liberty and freedom. i've been working with the cato institute since 1995 and full time since 2007. host: mary, fort washington, maryland. democrat. caller: i would suggest thinking t
michigan. caller: my heart really bleeds for the former who owns a multimillion-dollar estate and is wary about his one cowboy that he employs. i think that is what is wrong with this system. it is greed. host: "the new york times" is reporting this morning possibly republicans considering extending tax cuts for middle class americans. "the new york times" is reporting this -- host: any fallback plan from republicans does not include a plan for the estate tax. guest: there is no easy solution to what is happening right now. the senate passed their tax bill over the summer. it was going to include an estate tax extension, as well. $3.5 million exemption. it was not put into the bill. the bill will do with a lot of things that are expiring but the estate tax will be left where was. that will be hanging out there. congress cannot let it hang out there for long. it shouldn't be at the level it was in 2001. it shows you how many things are hanging out there. even if fallback plan -- host: back to the capital gains tax on twitter. what does he mean by capital formation? guest: you want to encou
: the senator from michigan. ms. stabenow: thank you, mr. president. i want to take just a moment to thank our distinguished colleague and my dear friend for his wonderful service. we serve on the one hand three committees together. it's been my honor to serve on the committee that senator conrad chairs, the budget committee, and to have him serve as a senior member of the agriculture committee, which i chair, and to have both of us sit on the finance committee together. today he has done what he has always done for us, which is to provide vision, common sense, intelligence, and a lot of numbers. and they add up, and they make sense, and so in listening to senator conrad's farewell speech, i want to thank him again for giving us a path forward. this is someone who will forever be in the senate history record as one of the great statesmen of our country, someone with intelligence, respect on both sides, compassion, a fighter from north dakota like i've never seen, and someone who serves in the best tradition of what it means to be an honorable public servant. and so he's been a role model for m
was killed off duty in michigan in october of 1994. >> i am here because my son was murdered may 10, 2007, in chicago, illinois, on a crowded bus. >> my sister was a freshman at virginia tech. she was only 18 years old. >> my father was a professor and taught civil engineering at virginia tech and he was killed on april 16, 2007. >> my name is john woods. my girlfriend was killed that virginia tech. -- at virginia tech. >> i was shot four times at virginia tech and survived. i'm here for the 32 that did not. >> i'm from chicago and my son was murdered on church grounds while coming outside of the church. i am pleading for our leaders to help us. >> i am here on behalf of my daughter who was murdered on march 30, 2010, on south capitol street. she was 16 years old and my only child, with an ak-47. >> i came here from phoenix, arizona. i lost my son seven years ago. thank you. >> i'm here to give a voice to my baby sister who was killed when she was 15 in salt lake city. >> my daughter was killed in salt lake city. i was also seriously injured in 2007. >> my name is peter reed. my daughter
avenue from the maryland line, now as high as 45 miles an hour. north capital street from michigan avenue to harewood road from 35 to 40 and you can also go 40 miles an hour on canal road to fox hall. going on 40 is a pipe dream for some drivers. traffic is a mess, danella? >> it is. eastbound colombia pike, closed because of the earlier water main break. shut down between south wakefield street to south thomas street, so you want to make a right on and then a left on george mason drive to work around it. 66, just jammed from the beltway -- jammed from the by past to the beltway. back to you, aaron. >>> good morning, in the 40s now with a chance ♪ >>> back now with more of "today" on this tuesday morning, the 18th of december, 2012. a pretty day here in new york city. a little gray and drizzly. you look at some of the nice folks who have come down one week before christmas to get a look at that beautiful rockefeller center christmas tree. seven days -- well, six, i guess. >> seven. >> to shop? >> i believe so. >> all right. well, let's not have a fight about it. that wouldn't be the chr
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10